Rolling Stone: Metallica's Lars Ulrich: My 15 Favorite Metal and Hard Rock Albums

When Rolling Stone began ranking the 100 Greatest Metal Albums of All Time, one of the first musicians we consulted was Metallica's Lars Ulrich. Not only did he co-write and drum on five of the LPs that made the list – including the Number Two pick, Master of Puppets – he's been one of metal's most prominent and outspoken mouthpieces for nearly four decades now. He's demonstrated his impeccable taste in interviews and on Metallica's numerous "garage days" releases, on which they've covered songs by Diamond Head, Black Sabbath, Motörhead, Mercyful Fate and many other artists who also ultimately made the cut on our list. In short, Ulrich and his bandmates' taste defined the tastes of generations to come.

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June 22, 2017 In the Press

Variance Magazine: Over Roaring Riffs & Fireballs, 'Hardwired' Metallica Proposes Unity for All at Soldier Field

As far as the members of Metallica were concerned in the summer of 2017, it didn’t matter anyone’s age, race, religion, politics or even dietary preferences. Instead, the band comprised of front man James Hetfield, guitarist Kirk Hammett, bassist Robert Trujillo and drummer Lars Ulrich were wholeheartedly committed to unifying a sold out Soldier Field rather than digging deeper into the hole of society’s current divisions.

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June 20, 2017 In the Press

Chicago Reader: Metallica fought fire with fire at Soldier Field

Metallica sometimes still earn the title of greatest thrash band on earth, because they can play like more than the sum of their parts: James Hetfield, the riff master; Kirk Hammett, the shredder supreme; new(ish) guy Robert Trujillo, the bringer of monstrous low end; and Lars Ulrich, who every once in a while decides to not drum totally horribly. The four horsemen hit Solider Field last night in support of the 2016 album Hardwired . . . to Self-Destruct, performing their first Chicago show since 2009 (if you don't count Lollapalooza in 2015, which you shouldn't). It delivered exactly what you'd want, or at least what you'd expect, out of late-period Metallica: insanely loud guitars, pyrotechnics, and thrash classics new and old. Photographer Bobby Talamine came out to document the destruction.

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June 19, 2017 In the Press

Rolling Stone: Inside Metallica's Mammoth WorldWired Tour, Their Biggest Trek Ever

"Do you always do that?" Metallica's hulking frontman, James Hetfield, asks Lars Ulrich, a hint of agitation in his voice. The two are facing each other in the "Tuning Room," where the band typically rehearses before a show. It's roughly 20 minutes to showtime on the first night of the tour, at Baltimore's M&T Bank Stadium, and they're trying to get their 1991 classic "Wherever I May Roam" right, but the drummer is playing a strange off-kilter rhythm.

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June 19, 2017 In the Press

Chicago Sun Times: Metallica delivers Super Bowl-level show at Soldier Field

At one point in Metallica’s sold-out show at Soldier Field Sunday night, singer James Hetfield turned to an 8-year-old boy sitting on top of his father’s shoulders and asked him point-blank, “What does the next generation want to hear? … Do you want it heavy?” before the boy (and the crowd) roared with applause and the band chugged its way into ’91 staple “Sad But True.”

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June 19, 2017 In the Press

Dallas Observer: Metallica Learns to Live in the Shadow of its History at AT&T Stadium

Thirty-one years ago, Metallica released its masterpiece, Master of Puppets. Not that you'll see the group commemorate it with an anniversary tour: The Angeleno metal legends are on the road for their WorldWired Tour, promoting their latest album, Hardwired...to Self-Destruct. But as they visited Arlington in Friday night for a stop at AT&T Stadium, the typically unsentimental bunch seemed to have found some degree of peace with their past — in their unapologetic way.

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June 18, 2017 In the Press

The Washington Times: Not fading to black: Metallica WorldWired tour keeps rock alive during Dallas stop

You’d never know these four guys are in their fifties. Nor that they’ve been doing this for — wait for it — 36 years.

To put that into perspective, when Metallica first came on the scene in 1981, Ronald Reagan had just become president, a gallon of gas was a buck 35 and “Three’s Company” and “The Jeffersons” ruled the airwaves.

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June 18, 2017 In the Press

Fort Worth Star Telegram: Metallica lights up AT&T Stadium with a righteous trip down memory lane

Metallica lead singer James Hetfield let an eager crowd at AT&T Stadium on Friday night in on the meaning behind one of the metal mainstay’s new tracks, “Moth Into Flame” before the show took a righteous trip down Metal Memory Lane.

“This song is about fame and how it draws you in,” Hetfield said, in a moment that might as well have described the last 25 years of the band’s history. “But it’s just a trap.”

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June 17, 2017 In the Press

AXS: Metallica hardwired to show Alamodome why they still rule metal world

The kings of metal invaded San Antonio on Wednesday night for their first visit in nearly eight years, poised to demonstrate how they've been hardwired to rule the metal landscape for 36 years.

James. Kirk. Lars. Robert.

Very few bands have members known the world over with no last names required, but Metallica has been the Paul, John, George and Ringo of heavy metal on the strength of timeless music and pushing the boundaries of its genre while taking risks other artists don't dare to tread. If they continue to destroy football stadiums in their wake just for the hell of it, so be it.

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June 16, 2017 In the Press

San Antonio Current: Metallica Sought And Destroyed The Alamodome

Long before you could hear Metallica songs echoing through aisles at HEB during your Sunday afternoon shopping, metal was a socially disruptive and noisy genre that signified rebellion, a challenge to the status quo.

The genre still carries a similar spirit today, but Metallica were one of those pivotal early metal bands that pushed the genre into the mainstream and carved a path for other bands that would emerge with a similar sound. Wednesday night at The Alamodome, the band reminded us why by pummeling the Alamodome with quakes of lightning fast guitar riffs, literal explosions, and vocal melodies that we’ve kept close to our heart since the first time we heard James Hetfield sing them.

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June 15, 2017 In the Press

my San Antonio: Review: Metallica makes thunderous return to San Antonio

When Metallica says they love you, they’re done.

Such was the muttered sentiment of one the 48,000 or so fans filing out of the Alamodome on Wednesday after Metallica’s final encore song, “Enter Sandman.”

Guitarist and frontman James Hetfield wanted to make certain the message was conveyed loud and clear after the more than two-hour concert. After all, the heavy-metal legends have a history here dating to a nightclub gig in the early 1980s.

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June 15, 2017 In the Press

Chicago Tribune: Metallica bassist Robert Trujillo has the gift of timing

Advice from Metallica's Robert Trujillo: If you ever find yourself standing before Zakk Wylde, longtime Ozzy Osbourne guitarist and Black Label Society metal frontman, do not, under any circumstances, slap him, even for fun. "The last person I'd want to have a play slap fight with is Zakk Wylde when he's liquored up, because Zakk Wylde doesn't know how to have an innocent slap fight," the veteran bassist says, by phone from a tour stop in Denver. "The moment you connect with him, you get a fist to the jaw, instantly."

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June 13, 2017 In the Press

Houston Press: Metallica Carries the Torch for Stadium Rock at NRG

As people streamed into NRG Stadium from all sides on Sunday evening, it was hard not to wonder if we’d ever see such a sight again: a pack of tried-and-true guitar-slingers convincingly filling up the biggest venue in town. Guns ’N Roses did it last year. U2 did it last month. On Sunday, it was Metallica — perhaps the last (and biggest) torchbearers for stadium rock.

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June 12, 2017 In the Press